Nursing Home Resident Rights

A nursing home is an establishment that provides care for elderly or disabled people who are no longer able to live on their own and care for themselves. Though there is a certain expectation of care when an elderly or disabled person is placed into a nursing home, there have been cases or neglect, inadequate care and even abuse.

Due to these and other reasons, in 1987 the Nursing Home Reform Act was passed. The reform act created and published The Residents’ Bill of Rights, consisting of three main sections—the third entailing a list of 28 specified rights. This bill of rights gave nursing home residents many fundamental, human rights, including privacy, accommodation of needs, quality treatment, free communication and much more.

In order to add additional protections for the elderly and infirm, in 1987 the Nursing Home Reform Act was passed. This reform created “The Residents’ Bill of Rights”, which further articulate a resident’s rights. This bill of rights has allowed nursing home residents a tool to assist in enforcement of their fundamental human rights, including privacy, accommodation of needs, quality treatment, free communication and much more.

The Resident's Bill of Rights include the following:

    The right to privacy
    The right to exercise self-determination
    The right to freedom from abuse, mistreatment and neglect
    The right to freedom from physical restraints
    The right to be treated with dignity
    The right to communicate freely
    The right to accommodation of medical, physical, psychological and social needs
    The right to voice grievances without discrimination or reprisal
    The right to participate in resident and family groups
    The right to participate in the review of one's care plan and to be fully informed in advance about any changes in care, treatment or change of status in the facility

There are also now mandatory federal and state guidelines by which nursing homes are required to pass to receive their government funding. A nursing home is required to provide a certain level and quality of care to its residents, making sure that elderly and disabled people are treated right by their caretakers.

If you or someone you love has been a victim of nursing home negligence, inadequate care or abuse, contact a lawyer like Maloney Law Group that will help you navigate a case. Our consultation service is free.

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